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PolymerOlogyTM 

 

1960′s

SAP Development begins

The USDA began to develop a Super Absorbent Polymer to improve water conservation in soil.

1970′s

Generation 1 Polymers

USDA pioneers a Generation 1 super absorbent polymer deemed the “Super Slurper,” a strach graft polymer.

1980′s

USDA Shares the Technology

USDA gave away technical know how to several US based companies to develop the technology further.

1990′s

Starch Graft Production Issues

Starch graft polymers encounter production issues, leaving the industry dominated 98% by petroleum derived products.

2000′s

Generation 2 Polymers

Found to be costly to produce due to cost of raw inputs and very hazardous manufacturer filtration process.

2010′s

TryEco Premium Generation 3 Polymers

TryEco creates a premium biodegradable starch based super absorbent polymer suitable for agriculture use and beyond. With a simple, clean, green manufacturing process.

Defining Generations in Polymers

TryEco the world’s first Generation 3 polymer

Superabsorbent polymers (SAP’s) are materials that can absorb at least 10 times their own weight in liquid and that retain the absorbed liquid under moderate pressure. The absorbed liquid is taken into the molecular structure of the SAP rather than being contained in pores from which the fluid could be eliminated by squeezing. Some specialty SAP’s can absorb up to several hundred times their weight in liquid.

There are two primary types of superabsorbent polymers: starch-graft polymers and those based on cross-linked polyacrylates.

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Cross-Linked Polyacrylate

Cross-Linked Polyacrylate typically referred to as plastics, is a polymer that starts with the use of acrylic acid and sodium. Sodium polyacrylate is an example of a super-absorbing polymer that is a cross-linked (network) polymer that contains sodium atoms. It absorbs water by a process called osmosis. When the (sodium-containing) polymer is placed in contact with water, there is a tendency for the sodium to distribute equally between the network and the water. That means, some of the sodium atoms want to leave the network and move to the water. When these sodium atoms leave, they are replaced with water molecules. Water swells the polymer network to try to keep the sodium concentration balanced between the polymer and the water.

The cross-links that connect the chains together prevent them from dissolving/breaking apart in the water. Sodium polyacrylate can absorb 800 times its weight in distilled water, but only 300 times its weight in tap water, since tap water contains some sodium, calcium and other mineral salts. Due to the high levels of salt content as well as their derived petroleum base, cross-linked polyacrylates were demined unusable for agriculture food crops.

Starch-Graft Polymer

Starch-Graft Polymer’s were the first created in the 1960’s by the USDA. The USDA began to develop super absorbent polymers to improve water conservation in soil. In 1973 the USDA finally hit its mark creating a generation 1, Starch-Graft Polymer coined the “Super Slurper”. The USDA developed a resin based on the grafting of acrylonitrile polymer onto the backbone of starch molecules (i.e. starch-grafting) Using a much cheaper, biodegradable ingredient such as starch to build the backbone as an alternative to a petroleum was a very attractive opportunity. The USDA gave the technical know how to several US based companies to develop the technology further. A wide range of grafting combinations were attempted including work with acrylic acid, acrylamide and polyvinyl alcohol.

After decades of development and the failure of several starch-graft polymer producers to manufacture the polymer in a costly and efficient manor (Due to the expensive filtration process). The industry had almost given up hope, until now! TryEco has created a generation 3 starch-based superabsorbent polymer suitable for agricultural uses and beyond. The patented revolutionary formula allows for a premium, biodegradable polymer at a highly competitive price. TryEco has solved the expensive and hazardous manufacturing process associated with generation 1 and 2 polymers and we are produced right here in the USA. TryEco takes sustainable business practices very seriously and looks to create a new industry paradigm. Consumers have required change and TryEco has met their demands.

The Next Generation of Polymer 

After decades of development and the failure of several starch-graft polymer producers to manufacture the polymer in a cost efficient manor (due to the expensive filtration process). The industry had almost given up hope, until now! TryEco has created a generation 3 starch-based superabsorbent polymer suitable for agricultural uses and beyond. The patented revolutionary formula allows for a premium, biodegradable polymer at a highly competitive price. TryEco has solved the expensive and hazardous manufacturing process associated with generation 1 and 2 polymers and we are produced right here in the USA. TryEco takes sustainable business practices very seriously and looks to create a new industry paradigm. Consumers have required change and TryEco has met their demands.

Comparing the Generations of Polymers

Generation 1 Polymers

A pioneering starch-based polymer with strong and quick absorbency properties that was created by the USDA in the 1970s.

  • Developed by the USDA in 1970
  • Suffered from salt instabilities
  • Costly to produce
  • Weak absorption
  • Inferior performance characteristics compared to gen 2 & 3
  • Sodium acrylates

Generation 2 Polymers

Found to perform very well with good absorption rates under extensive field trials, but is not currently produced in the U.S.
  • Not produced in the USA
  • Yellowish tint in color
  • Smells of ammonia
  • Usage of methanol, ceric ammonia nitrate and acrylonitrile
  • Salts left over
  • Costly to produce due to raw material inputs

TryEco Generation 3 Polymer

The TryEco polymer with Drought Defender Technology demonstrates the same impressive performance as the Generation 2 Polymer, but offers the following advantages:
  • Made in the USA
  • Clean, clear & odorless product
  • Biodegradable
  • No methanol or acrylonitrile
  • Established USDA BioPreferred Program US Biobased Company.
  • Solves production issues
  • Same final molecular composition as the gen 2 polymer, but cleaner final structure.